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Sue Ryder

Sue Ryder


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Susan Ryder was born in Leeds on 3rd July, 1924. Her father, Charles Foster Ryder, was a gentleman landowner with estates in Yorkshire and East Anglia. He had five children from his first marriage. Sue's mother, Mabel Sims, was his second wife. Richard K. Morris has pointed out: "Mabel was a warm-hearted mother who read aloud to her children, wrote them stories, invented games, played songs for them to sing and encouraged their interests.... A tireless worker for scores of causes, she was one of life's givers."

Susan Ryder was educated at home (the family had houses in Scarcroft and Great Thurlow). She later wrote: "We lived in Scarcroft near Leeds and, until the early thirties, for four months of the year at Thurlow in Suffolk. Though Scarcroft was village on the main Leeds-Wetherby road, our pleasant home was almost within walking distance of terrible slums. As a child I visited that people living there, and the children would come over to us for outings and to play in our fields and garden. I remember preparing food and bags of sweets for them, and enjoyed joining in the excitement of their outings away from the back-to-back houses and narrow cobbled streets - the only places they had to play. The bad housing conditions appalled me. It was usual to find only one bedroom in a house, which meant that the children had to sleep with their parents and sometimes a sick person too. Several children would share the same bed. The dreariness of their surroundings, with no lavatory, often no water tap, little to eat and frequently no change of clothes or shoes horrified me."

Her biographer, Mark Pottle, has pointed out: "Religion was central to her upbringing and she learned from her mother especially the value of Christian compassion. A short distance from the comfortable family home at Scarcroft were terrible slum dwellings, where her mother undertook social work. Accompanying her on visits there the young Sue Ryder witnessed poverty at first hand and was shocked by what she saw."

Charles Ryder was a well-educated man who had a deep interest in history and literature. At an early age he talked to his daughter about the latest novels of Aldous Huxley and H. G. Wells. Like his wife he had progressive political opinions and championed the rights of small nations. He had been particularly concerned about the rise of Benito Mussolini, Adolf Hitler and Francisco Franco.

Susan Ryder was educated at home (the family had houses in Scarcroft and Great Thurlow). This included studying the poetry of Julian Grenfell, Rupert Brooke, Siegfried Sassoon, and Wilfred Owen. She was also given a practical education. From the age of eight she was encouraged to work in the dairy, scrubbing its flagstones, dispensing milk to villagers, butter-making and assisting the delivery of calves. She was also taught to drive a tractor.

Susan completed her education at Benenden School. One of her friends at school was a Jewish refugee from Italy. She wrote to her mother: "She tells me in graphic detail about the arrests, suspicions and the Fascists. Her family only just got out in time, thousands were left. Many won't realize or believe the fate which awaits them. Equally, the majority of people don't understand the full horror of what is happening and being planned... If one didn't believe in God and justice in the next world, one might despair."

On the outbreak of the Second World War, she was too young at sixteen to enlist in anything. In 1940 she joined the First Aid Nursing Yeomanry. Soon afterwards she went to work for the Special Operations Executive. According to her biographer, Mark Pottle: "Her duties included driving the agents to airfields from which they would be flown into occupied Europe. Their bravery left an indelible mark upon her and she searched for some way of perpetuating the qualities that they represented."

In 1942 Susan Ryder married a young naval officer who was killed in action soon afterwards. In the following year she was sent overseas with the SOE, first to North Africa and then to Italy. At the end of the war she became a member of the Amis des Volontaires Français and worked with other relief units in Europe. In Germany she worked with those who had been arrested by the Allies in the aftermath of the war. Morris has argued: "Bewildered survivors of concentration camps and forced labour were at large in the countryside, foraging for food and raiding farms. Some developed entrepreneurial skills in the black market. Girls sold themselves. A few hunted down their former persecutors."

The Allied forces of occupation dealt harshly with those who broke the law and large numbers were sentenced to lengthy spells in prison. Susan Ryder became their advocate: "By 1950 there were 1,400 of them.... She drove thousands of miles a year to visit them, challenged their indictments, pored over legal texts and pleaded for them in courts, sat with them around their night-fires amid the rubble of shattered cities, brought them books and food, pestered Allied officers for the commutation of their sentences, found new homes for them in other parts of the world, smuggled victims from zone to zone and pleaded their cause to anyone who would listen." According to Mark Pottle: "Ryder worked wherever she perceived the need, and was instinctively drawn to the neglected. In German prisons she found many non-Germans harshly sentenced by military courts for crimes ranging from petty theft to murder. Ryder took up the cause of these forgotten men, who were often the survivors of concentration camps, and fought doughtily against official obstruction to improve their conditions. She visited some 130 prisons regularly and also established, briefly, a holiday home in Denmark for concentration camp survivors and those with long-term illnesses."

In 1952 Sue Ryder established a home for this people in Bad Neuheim. Another one followed in Großburgwedel. "With the help of a small legacy, credit from the bank and much optimism" she established the Sue Ryder Foundation in 1953. According to its charter: "This is an international foundation devoted to the relief of suffering on the widest scale. It seeks to render personal service to those in need and to give affection to those who are unloved, regardless of age, race or creed, as part of the Family of man."

In 1955 Sue Ryder met Leonard Cheshire. As Richard K. Morris has pointed out: "Although their two charities differed in scope, there were concordances. Both had begun as spontaneous individual responses to immediate need, both were concerned with the relief of suffering, each laid paramount emphasis upon personal, voluntary sacrifice and each laid paramount emphasis upon personal, voluntary sacrifice and each had been fuelled by a Christian impulse."

The couple visited India in 1957. The following year they travelled to Germany together and discussed the possibility of some joint projects. In September 1958 they announced plans to open a home for the incurably ill in Poland, which would be run under a new Ryder-Cheshire Foundation. Cheshire later recalled: "We would have been happier still if our respective foundations.... had been able to merge. But they had each been in existence too long, each with their specific terms of reference and their own separate body of supporters, to make that possible."

The Foundation's aim was to take on projects which did not quite fall within the remit of either of their own larger foundations, Leonard Cheshire Disability and Sue Ryder Foundation. The first project was the Raphael Centre for lepers. Cheshire and Ryder had first encountered the lepers near Dehra Dun: "I am not quite sure how or by whom I was first told of the Dip, for one could well live in Dehra Dun half a lifetime and not really know that it existed. It was an unsavoury place on the south-western edge of the town that must once upon a time have been a largish quarry. An open drain ran through the middle of it and at the far end was a city refuse dump... From the road itself the Dip was out ofsight. Indeed one would have to walk up to its edge and peer into it before realizing that it contained a cluster of little mud houses with beaten-out milk-powder tins for roofing, and that a hundred or more people actually lived in them.... I shall never forget my first impression of this little community, barricaded, as it were, from the rest of the town and yet m essence dust another section of the city itself, whose inhabitants were owed the same rights and privileges as everybody else... the sheer poverty of the tiny houses in which they lived was not very different from other shanty towns I had seen... But somehow the combination of such a degree of poverty with the fact of being ostracized had the effect of creating a common solidarity. Certainly I was not prepared for the extraordinary and spontaneous warmth of their welcome."

Cheshire asked Sue Ryder to marry him. As she recalled in her autobiography, Child of my Love (1986), at first she had doubts about the idea: "The work had meant my life, and nothing I felt should or could change this. How in the future could one combine both marriage and work? Moreover, even in normal circumstances, marriage inevitably brings great responsibilities - I had always felt that it was a gamble. Furthermore, the implications are so serious that it is wiser to remain single and work than to run the risk of an unhappy marriage. Comparatively few people prepare themselves for or are equal to sharing literally everything." They were married on 5th April 1959.

According to her biographer, Mark Pottle: "After an all too brief honeymoon in India they began their married life with an arduous joint fund-raising tour of Australia and New Zealand. Mother Teresa of Calcutta had once told them that they would find the sacrifices that marriage entailed worthwhile, and so it proved. Together they shared happiness, as well as the enormous demands placed upon them by their respective foundations, to which each was a willing martyr. On their return to Britain they lived in a small flat at Cavendish. A son and daughter were born in 1960 and 1962 but Ryder did not allow pregnancy to interrupt her work. She preferred action to delegation and was happiest when driving through the night to open a new home or deliver aid.... Small, thin, and neatly dressed, with characteristic headscarves, she seemed to have no interest in food... Her family background lent a grandeur to her manner that she never lost, in spite of the simplicity of her tastes and the frugality of her lifestyle. And behind the piety there was a lively character with a hint of flirtatiousness."

In 1975 Sue Ryder published an autobiography, And the Morrow is Theirs. Four years later she was created a life peer in recognition of being one of the greatest Christian charity workers of her time. Her title, Baroness Ryder of Warsaw, was a personal tribute to the people of Poland. She played an active and independent part in House of Lords debates. A second volume of autobiography, Child of my Love, was published in 1986.

Leonard Cheshire died in 1992. Sue Ryder continued her charity work and by this time the Sue Ryder Foundation ran 80 homes in a dozen countries, with 28 in Poland and 22 in Yugoslavia.She became a household name through a chain of about 500 high-street charity shops. However, as Mark Pottle points out: "Her last years were overshadowed by a bitter dispute with the trustees of the Sue Ryder Foundation over their plans to modernize the charity - a case of what some in the sector unkindly, if aptly, called ‘founder member syndrome’. The dispute caused great distress to Lady Ryder, and damage to the charity that she had created, and reached a sad conclusion in 1998 when Sue Ryder severed links with the Sue Ryder Foundation."

The Independent reported: "The Sue Ryder Foundation was established 47 years ago to help the homeless in the aftermath of the Second World War but it subsequently widened its appeal to include the sick and needy in Britain and had a string of health care homes and 500 charity shops. But in recent months she had become estranged from the organisation, which changed its name to Sue Ryder Care and dropped her traditional logo, a sprig of rosemary for remembrance, in favour of an image of a smiling sun. Lady Ryder was angered and before she went into hospital set up a new organisation to keep faith with her original principles of compassion and the relief of suffering." In September 2000, Sue Ryder established Sue Ryder Care.

Sue Ryder died after a lengthy illness at Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, on 2nd November 2000.

Bewildered survivors of concentration camps and forced labour were at large in the countryside, foraging for food and raiding farms. A few hunted down their former persecutors...

By 1950 there were 1,400 of them.... She (Sue Ryder) drove thousands of miles a year to visit them, challenged their indictments, pored over legal texts and pleaded for them in courts, sat with them around their night-fires amid the rubble of shattered cities, brought them books and food, pestered Allied officers for the commutation of their sentences, found new homes for them in other parts of the world, smuggled victims from zone to zone and pleaded their cause to anyone who would listen.

I am not quite sure how or by whom I was first told of the Dip, for one could well live in Dehra Dun half a lifetime and not really know that it existed. Indeed one would have to walk up to its edge and peer into it before realizing that it contained a cluster of little mud houses with beaten-out milk-powder tins for roofing, and that a hundred or more people actually lived in them....

I shall never forget my first impression of this little community, barricaded, as it were, from the rest of the town and yet m essence dust another section of the city itself, whose inhabitants were owed the same rights and privileges as everybody else... Certainly I was not prepared for the extraordinary and spontaneous warmth of their welcome.

The Raphael hospital project started alright; we felled trees and cleared the site to start building. Marked out the position of the various wards and buildings... Then things started to slow. There was difficulty in obtaining construction drawings from the design engineers in England... A worse problem was lack of funds. For a time this brought the work to a halt.

It was decided to put the building materials on site to good use... a number ofsmall houses were put up to accommodate lepers who were outcasts and living on the city rubbish dump. The most difficult and distressing thing was to choose just two or three people at a time out of many to live in the houses we had built. People would hang on to us and our legs asking to be taken in. But we only had enough materials and money to build no more than six simple little houses.

The work had meant my life, and nothing I felt should or could change this. Comparatively few people prepare themselves for or are equal to sharing literally everything.

The Sue Ryder Foundation was established 47 years ago to help the homeless in the aftermath of the Second World War but it subsequently widened its appeal to include the sick and needy in Britain and had a string of health care homes and 500 charity shops.

But in recent months she had become estranged from the organisation, which changed its name to Sue Ryder Care and dropped her traditional logo, a sprig of rosemary for remembrance, in favour of an image of a smiling sun. Lady Ryder was angered and before she went into hospital set up a new organisation to keep faith with her original principles of compassion and the relief of suffering.


Sue Ryder Wiki, Biography, Net Worth, Age, Family, Facts and More

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BIOGRAPHY

Sue Ryder is a well known Philanthropist. Sue was born on July 3, 1924 in Leeds, Yorkshire, England..Sue is one of the famous and trending celeb who is popular for being a Philanthropist. As of 2018 Sue Ryder is 76 years (age at death) years old. Sue Ryder is a member of famous Philanthropist list.

Wikifamouspeople has ranked Sue Ryder as of the popular celebs list. Sue Ryder is also listed along with people born on 3-Jul-24. One of the precious celeb listed in Philanthropist list.

Nothing much is known about Sue Education Background & Childhood. We will update you soon.

Details
Name Sue Ryder
Age (as of 2018) 76 years (age at death)
Profession Philanthropist
Birth Date 3-Jul-24
Birth Place Leeds, Yorkshire, England
Nationality Leeds

Sue Ryder Net Worth

Sue primary income source is Philanthropist. Currently We don’t have enough information about his family, relationships,childhood etc. We will update soon.

Estimated Net Worth in 2019: $100K-$1M (Approx.)

Sue Age, Height & Weight

Sue body measurements, Height and Weight are not Known yet but we will update soon.

Family & Relations

Not Much is known about Sue family and Relationships. All information about his private life is concealed. We will update you soon.

Facts

  • Sue Ryder age is 76 years (age at death). as of 2018
  • Sue birthday is on 3-Jul-24.
  • Zodiac sign: Cancer.

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Sue Ryder - History

Lady Ryder of Warsaw (1923-2000)

Sue Ryder, our Founder, served with the Polish section of the secret Special Operations Executive during World War II. She met people of extraordinary courage and saw the human suffering of war. When peace came, she began relief work for the millions of sick, homeless and destitute across the continent. She went on to work in other parts of the world, confronting poverty and disease. The charity was established in 1953 in the UK, with the creation of their first Nursing Home in rural Suffolk.

Sue Ryder's strength and determination has underpinned nearly five decades of wonderful achievements and helped transform the lives of hundreds of thousands of people. Today we have 6 Centres and 30 shops in Ireland and provide international aid services stretching from Macedonia to Malawi.

Our permanent and volunteer staff have always formed the heart of the charity and will continue to do so as we proceed into the new century.


Przeczytaj artykuł w wersji polskiej

Sue Ryder was a British charity activist who established a wide-ranging charitable activity across the World. She founded an international charity in tribute to the victims of World War II. As Lady Ryder of Warsaw, she sat in the British House of Lords. She was a great friend of Poland and Poles. In Poland, she founded nursing homes, hospitals and hospice in as many as 30 towns.

Margaret Susan Ryder, better known as Sue Ryder, was born on July 3, 1923, in a city hospital in Leeds, a family settlement in the county of Suffolk. The family house was later used as a shelter to help the poor and the victimised.

After the outbreak of World War II, at only 16 years of age, she volunteered for the formation of first aid nurses. During the War, Susan Ryder served in the Polish section of the British Special Operations Executive (S.O.E.), a diversion in occupied Europe. In August 1944, she was helping in the Warsaw Uprising. She was closely collaborating with “Cichociemni” Polish Special Forces, whose courage, determination and dedication had a profound impact on her future. During her service, she was directly confronted with the enormity of human suffering. At the end of the War, she was assisting to save former prisoners of German camps. At the same time, she visited prisons, saving the lives of many sentenced to death by the communist regime. These experiences have resulted in continuous involvement in charity work for the sick, the homeless and the deprived of human dignity. Soon her help arrived at other continents.

In the background – Sue Ryder’s portrait painted by Barbara Kaczmarowska Hamilton

In 1953, she founded the Charity of her name. “There’s rosemary, that’s for Remembrance, Pray, Love, remember” – a quote from Hamlet and a twig of rosemary became a symbol of the foundation, a living monument to millions of people who, in defending human values, gave their lives during the war. The Sue Ryder Foundation has built more than eighty homes in fifteen countries in the World, which today serve the sick and the suffering.

Until 1978, Sue Ryder had organised holiday and rehabilitation trips to the UK for former prisoners of German concentration camps. This form of assistance was offered to as many as 8000 people, mostly Poles who suffered in the camps. Together with her husband Leonard Cheshire (1917-1992), a famous hero of World War II, and charity activist in his own right, she initiated joint humanitarian actions in various countries in the World, affected by the human tragedy.

For the purpose of financing the Foundation’s activities, Sue Ryder founded more than 600 charitable stores.

Apparently, her sentiment to Poland was partly due to love that she, as a teenager, had for a handsome Polish Special Force Operative “Cichociemny”. It was not love with a happy ending though – he was killed in battle. However, Sue Ryder held a very special place in her heart for the Poles for the rest of her life.

Poland has always been a focus for Sue Ryder. Immediately after the war, together with an international group of volunteers, she continued to help Poland and Poles. In Poland, she built more than 30 care homes, which have accommodated the sick, the lonely and the homeless people. Today in Poland, many places are named after Sue Ryder. In Warsaw there is Sue Ryder Museum – the only museum in the World devoted to Sue Ryder with its props, recordings, photographs, wide correspondence and archives documenting her life.

Sue Ryder’s Museum in Warsaw

When the Foundation was established in 1953 in the United Kingdom, Sue Ryder was assisted by Poles saved from the German concentration camps – the so-called “Misplaced Persons”. Some of them were staying in the family estate of Sue Ryder in Cavendish, which she inherited from her family. This House and Estate was the first care home, mainly occupied by people who were haunted by tragic memories and traumas of the recent war. Sue Ryder and her family – husband and two children – resided in a one small apartment. The majority of the house they gave for use of other residents.

In her activities to help Poles, Sue Ryder intensified efforts and began to build a hospital in Konstancin-Jeziorna, near Warsaw. In Poland she also founded another hospital in Gdynia. To this day in Gdynia there is a square of her name, in the very Center, located next to Piłsudski Avenue as a proof of gratitude of the local community. In addition, she founded the Centre of Oncology and a number of social care homes –in Psary, Góra Kalwaria, Cracow, Radzymin, Popkowice and in other towns in Poland.

Her foundations in the UK and Poland have similar objectives: supporting elderly and disabled people – those incurably ill with cancer and neurological diseases, and those who have lost their families and are lonely or sick – all her foundations follow the motto of Sue Ryder: Do what you can for the person in front of you ‘.

In 1956 Sue Ryder embarked on a fifty-year mission in Poland with a group of her Polish colleagues and volunteers. She found them among former prisoners of concentration camps, war veterans and their families. Many of them have been voluntarily cooperating with the Foundation for years, and even became part of its authorities. Sue Ryder was unable to officially register her Foundation in Poland during the communist period, and all the houses she had built, were gifted to the Polish state. The Foundation in Poland has an independent legal personality and is established by the founder to continue her mission in Poland. It was only in July,1991 that the Foundation of Sue Ryder was officially established in Poland, under a notarial deed, and in the following year the registration process was completed. The Foundation in Poland has an independent legal personality and was established by the founder to continue her mission in Poland and to take care of the houses she established and their wards.

The Sue Ryder Foundation in Poland is the only authorised entity to act on behalf of the former English Foundation. The charity’s goals include: to help people suffering or in need, help those of poor living conditions, those who are excluded because of social and health reasons, and act to remove or alleviate their sufferings.

Iwona Golinska, the Executive Consultant for Sue Ryder Poland said to portal British Poles: “My function is advisory towards Sue Ryder Poland. I have partnered with the Sue Ryder Foundation since 2016 however I was interested in Sue Ryder ‘s Foundation for a long time. My family knew personally Sue Ryder in London since the 50s. I always supported Sue Ryder’s shops, which I keenly visit bringing my stuff or buying presents for friends. I have many friends, old emigres, who live in London since the post-war times as well as those who left Poland for the UK during communism, and who knew and supported Sue Ryder and helped her in her activities for years”. In 2016 Iwona Golinska founded the Association of Sue Ryder Polska in the United Kingdom. She further explains: “The idea is to raise awareness of Sue Ryder among Poles in the UK – more than a million Poles are based in the UK and can help us to support Polish care homes back home. We will help the poorest and the weakest in our home country. Poland has still enormous needs in this area. We need to mobilise our hearts. I myself am taking care of my mum who is disabled, and I know the subject of disability well. I know how much help, good heart, good words and daily care is needed”.

On the 5th of May, at the London POSK, Iwona Golinska organised a very special event devoted to Sue Ryder in order to promote her ideas in our Polish community in the UK. She comments: “I was able to persuade the Polish Ambassador to the UK, Prof. Arkady Rzegocki to personally gave us an honorary patronate of the exhibition entitled ‘Sue Ryder – Life for People’, devoted to the life and activities of our patron, combined with a projection of a film about Sue Ryder. It was an exhibition about the life of Sue Ryder and propagating her idea of charity. As part of the meeting we also invited the British Foundation of Sue Ryder and people who personally knew Sue Ryder such as Halina Kent and Dr Bożena Laskiewicz. We were also able to collect some donations to support Sue Ryder Museum in Warsaw. I have pleasure to invite both Poles and Brits to this Museum dedicated to Sue Ryder – a great Samaritan, often compared to Mother Theresa of Calcutta”.

This exhibition was well coordinated with the fact that this year is the 100 th anniversary of the diplomatic relations between Poland and Britain. Lady Sue Ryder of Warsaw, as a big friend of Poland, is a great example of good relations between our countries. The meeting in POSK was held as part of ‘ Polish Heritage Days ‘ in the UK. This was the first public charity event organised by the Sue Ryder Foundation in the UK.

“I already today can invite you to meet in the Polish Ognisko in London Kensington which will be held in the 20th Anniversary of the death of Sue Ryder (she died in November 2000). We invited the Prince of Kent to this event, who is the patron of the Ognisko and who personally knew and supported Sue Ryder” says Iwona Golinska.

In Poland Sue Ryder Foundation operates a network of charity shops that anyone can bring their belongings to and donate for charitable purposes, as far as they are suitable for use and are in good condition. One charity shop is in Bagatela street in Mokotow area in Warsaw, other in Żoliborz, in Bielany and in Wola – and this is only in Warsaw. In addition, there are shops in Katowice and Bielsko Biała.

Plaque at “Sue Ryder Square” in Gdynia, Poland, stating that she was an honorary citizen of the city and that her Foundation had helped fund a cancer ward there

All the houses of Sue Ryder focus on helping the sick and the elderly – those in need of care after 65 years of age, often palliative aid. Care homes are the establishments funded in Poland by Sue Ryder and donated to the Polish state. Currently, the Foundation takes care of 15 care homes, of which 14 have been built and completely equipped by Sue Ryder. The newest care home of Sue Ryder was founded in 2006 in Pierzchnica, Świętokrzyskie Voivodeship, with help of the local government funds. The first and the largest house was created in Konstancin-Jeziorna, near Warsaw and is still there today.

Iwona Golinska adds: „I like to underline that Sue Ryder Poland in Great Britain is dedicated to promoting the ideas of Sue Ryder by encouraging volunteering, creating interest amongst the Polish and British society including the government and business organizations as well as local authorities in the fate of the elderly, the sick, the disabled and the poor in accordance with the intentions of the Founder. We are also here to propagate ideas of charity and share information about life and achievements of our Patron – Sue Ryder. We invite all Poles in the UK and all Brits, friends of Poland to support good relations and build a strong Polish-British social bond”.

“I would like to invite all the readers of Portal British Poles to meet up at the Polish Ognisko in London Kensington on the event which will be held on the 20th Anniversary of the death of Sue Ryder (she died in November 2000). We invited the Prince of Kent to this event, who is the patron of the Ognisko and who personally knew and supported Sue Ryder” says Iwona Golinska.

Text: Iwona Golinska/British Poles

Pictures: Iwona Golińska and collection of Sue Ryder Fundation

Iwona Golinska is a director in the high technology industry. Based in London where she lives for 30 years. She graduated from business and finance at Sussex University, and then economics at Kingston University, Kingston Business School, where she studied for PhD. She has worked at various managerial positions in major information technology companies like Ericcson, HP and Lucent. She founded the Sue Ryder Poland in the UK, which works towards support of charity and building social links. Married and mother of an active 8-year-old.


Sue Ryder

Sue Ryder CMG, OBE was a humanitarian dedicated to the relief of suffering. She worked to support people with complex needs and life-threatening conditions internationally, and led many charitable organisations including the one named in her honour.

Ryder was born in 1924 in Leeds. As a child, she helped her mother provide help for people in the slums around Leeds. Following the outbreak of World War II, she volunteered for the First Aid Nursing Yeomanry at the age of 15, lying about her age to enlist. Ryder was soon assigned to the Polish section of the Special Operations Executive (SOE). The SOE were responsible for espionage, sabotage and reconnaissance against the Axis powers. Ryder served in Poland, North Africa, Italy and eventually Germany and saw the true devastation that the war had caused, including entering concentration camps.

After the war, Ryder volunteered to stay on in Poland and worked to find homes from those displaced during the war. Without her help, they would have had to resort to theft due to starvation and been arrested. Ryder later began bringing survivors from the concentration camps to England. Most of whom were sick and would require long term nursing. Ryder set them up in her mother’s house in Cavendish, Suffolk and the first Sue Ryder Home was born. In 1953, she founded the Sue Ryder Foundation in order to provide homes and domiciliary care teams for the sick and disabled internationally. Now simply named Sue Ryder, the charity operates more than 80 homes worldwide and has around 500 high street charity shops and 8,000 volunteers.

In 1979, Ryder was made a life peer, becoming Baroness Ryder of Warsaw, of Warsaw in Poland and of Cavendish in the County of Suffolk. She continued to support those in Poland whenever the need arose, and in 1989 she raised £40,000 through the Lady Ryder of Warsaw Appeals Fund and arranged lorries of medical and food air when communist rule in the country collapsed.

In 1998, she retired as a trustee and left Sue Ryder after a dispute with the other trustees. Two years later, she founded The Bouverie Trust (now known as The Lady Ryder of Warsaw Memorial Trust) to continue her charitable work. That same year, she died at the age of 77. Ryder was honoured for her humanitarian work during her lifetime, being appointed an Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE) in 1957 and appointed a Companion of the Order of St Michael and St George (CMG) in 1976. In 2016, it was announced that she would be honoured with a postage stamp by Royal Mail to celebrate her humanitarian work and the legacy she left behind.


Sue Ryder Job interview

I had an interview there about 4 years ago. Got the job
It was really simple and short. They just asked me why I wanted to work there, if I knew anything about Sue Ryder, and then when I was able to work. It was more of a chat as they also told me about what things I'd be doing and asked me if I'd be okay working possibly with people doing community service etc. I didn't know anything about the charity and it didn't matter. (Original post by katiee987)
I had an interview there about 4 years ago. Got the job
It was really simple and short. They just asked me why I wanted to work there, if I knew anything about Sue Ryder, and then when I was able to work. It was more of a chat as they also told me about what things I'd be doing and asked me if I'd be okay working possibly with people doing community service etc. I didn't know anything about the charity and it didn't matter. Don't stress out too much, remember it's only volunteering so won't be as intense as an actual job interview

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Ze života Sue Ryder

Informace o organizaci návštěv v domově pro seniory Sue Ryder - aktualizace k 1. červenci 2021

Fotogalerie: Letní hry aneb Poznej Sue Ryder

Dobročinné obchody Sue Ryder opět otevřeny! Uzavřen zůstává pouze obchod v Michli.

Fotogalerie: Po 15 měsících poprvé na výletě

Hledáme kolegy/ně na pozici všeobecná sestra

Fotogalerie: První felinoterapie v Sue Ryder


Lordshill and Lordswood Historical Society

I was so impressed with the Sue Ryder History and Legacy people, I have volunteered to join them and will be arranging venues for a series of talks around Southampton, and provide logistical support as necessary.

On 12 September the Sue Ryder team will talk to our history society at Manston Court, when I will be wearing my LHS hat, then a swift change of hats for a talk at Weston Court on 14 October, and then to Bassett Green at the end of November/early December (Date still to be finalised)., and lots of other places in 2012. It is going to be a busy year.

Having been the Lordshill Representative of SSAFA (Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, and Families Association) for over five years, I will also be wearing a SSAFA hat and following a similar route with talks throughout 2012, starting with the one to be delivered to LHS at Manston court on 14 November when we will receive a visit from Mr. Bruce Hartnell, Secretary of SSAFA. Southampton Division

This blog is of course about the Lords Hill and Lords Wood Historical Society so I will try to keep to the point, but the other people just might creep in now and again, and again, and again.

To recap on our future programme:
12. Sep. The life of Lady Sue Ryder, OBE, and the work of Sue Ryder Care.
10. Oct. Penny Legg will talk to us about her latest book "Voices of Southampton"
14. Nov The Story of SSAFA
12. Dec The origins of Santa Claus, and Christmas round the world
9 .Jan Mulberry Harbour: Parts played by Southampton, Portsmouth, Gosport, and Hayling Island.

Some interesting things in the pipe-line for 2012, but more about them nearer the time.


Sue Ryder Wheatfields Hospice

Did you know that this year Sue Ryder Wheatfields Hospice is 40 years old?

We have been in the heart of Headingley for 40 years providing specialist palliative and end of life care to thousands of people across Leeds. Whether we’re supporting people in the hospice in our 18 bed inpatient unit, their own homes or our day care services, our focus is on quality of life – giving every patient the care and support they need to spend the time they have left in the way they choose.

We have respect for all beliefs, religions and cultures and tailor your care accordingly. We can offer a range of care services to support you and your loved ones whilst you are in our care. We offer 24 hour expert care, 365 days a year provided by a wide range of professionals including doctors, nurses, therapists, palliative care specialist consultants, social workers and spiritual support.

We give emotional support for you and those close to you, including children, and advice about practical issues such as money concerns, social benefits and accessing equipment and services. There is access to a variety of therapies such as physiotherapy, complementary therapies and occupational therapies. A team of expert Sue Ryder community nurse specialists can support you at home. Our CNS team works closely with GPs, families and community teams to ensure patients receive expert care personalised to their needs

We are housed in one of Headingley’s most impressive Grade ll listed manor houses set in our own leafy grounds. Formerly known as Wheatfield Lodge, the house is a splendid Italian villa style property built around 1855. The inside of the building is equally impressive with marble Ionic columns, wrought iron balustraded stairs, and decorated friezes.

In 1855 Wheatfield Lodge was a family home. It became a regional seat of government in the Second World War and then afterwards was the base for the West Riding Squadron of the Royal Auxiliary Airforce. It then became a special school and Leeds City Council Training Centre for people with mental and learning difficulties before being taken over by the Sue Ryder Foundation in 1977. It opened as a hospice in 1978 and is now a comfortable home for all our activities.

We are a charity and all the services provided at Sue Ryder Wheatfields Hospice are completely free to patients and their loved ones, but we can only continue to do this thanks to the generosity of our supporters.

We also have a fabulous on-site charity shop that sells fantastic good quality items from clothing to bric-a-brac, bags and shoes as well as selling new goods. And it also features a lovely café where you can just relax while grabbing a delicious cup of coffee or tea.

Would you like to help us celebrate our 40th anniversary? Join us on Saturday 20 October on our Starlight Hike, a great event open to women, men and children www.sueryder.org/WheatfieldsSLH

If you would like to know more about what we do please visit www.sueryder.org/Wheatfields

Or you can also pop in for a visit and look out for a Wheatfields Rock of Kindness. We have a number of beautiful painted rocks hidden in our gardens, find one, take a photo and share it on Facebook, and then hide it again so someone else can find it!

Kate Bratt-Farrar
Hospice Director, Wheatfields Hospice
Grove Road, Leeds LS6 2AE
0113 278 7249
www.sueryder.org/care-centres/hospices/wheatfields

Read more about the history in The Wheatfields Story 1854-2002, from Family Home to Care Centre by Ronald Nelson Redman, published by Great Northern Books Ltd in 2002.
Read more about the Wheatfields building in D Linstrum, West Yorkshire Architects and Architecture, London, 1978


Benefits

Today, all the Sue Ryder stores run on LS Retail technology. The company has experienced several benefits from its new technology:

  • Lower cost of inventory. For its new items, the company now uses automated replenishment. The system automatically re-orders specific items, based on pre-set criteria. “Now we finally know what stock is selling, and what we need, in real time,” says Larcombe. “Replenishment is much more effective than it used to be, and it has brought stock holding down, saving us money.”
  • Smarter store space management. With real-time inventory information, the company can manage space more effectively, for example giving more space and visibility to popular item categories.
  • Real-time decision-making. Sue Ryder can now track business in its stores in real time, and take data-based decisions, quicker. “We can see how busy our stores are, what’s selling, and make judgements to improve the business,” says Larcombe.
  • Very quick employee training. “Having a till that is simple, clear, clean, and easy to use, is of great value for us,” says Larcombe. The volunteers in the Sue Ryder stores, some of whom are seniors who have no previous retail experience, can use the till easily after a short 45-minute training. “The training mode on the LS Retail till has been extremely useful, our volunteers can practice without doing transactions, and usually grasp it very quickly,” Larcombe adds.
  • Contactless and remote functionality. Sue Ryder can now offer contactless card payments. The company is also able to increase the limit automatically without having to send an engineer to the store locations. Both of these options proved very valuable during the Covid-19 restrictions.
  • Ability to run 3 companies within one database. The sales in the Sue Ryder stores are assigned to three separate companies. One manages second-hand and donated items, a second one is for new goods, and a third one sells lottery tickets (managed in partnership with a local lottery company). Today, all sales can be processed at the same till, and the system automatically moves the revenue to the right company, also calculating the VAT in the case of sales of new items.

“The LS Retail software solutions has enhanced our shops,” says Larcombe.

Sue Ryder plans to delve further into the system’s functionality. “We are looking into the LS Retail promotions and offers modules. We have just scratched the surface with what we can do with our new system,” Larcombe says.

The LS Retail solution has made work in the shops easier. We can see what products we have available and make judgments, like understanding what we need to buy, that increase our profit.


Watch the video: Ways you can be Grief Kind. Sue Ryder (June 2022).


Comments:

  1. Japhet

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  2. Milward

    I think this - the wrong way.

  3. Neshakar

    Make mistakes. I propose to discuss it.

  4. Ducage

    My opinion, the question is fully disclosed, the author tried, for which my bow to him!



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